Tag Archives: false diagnosis

Return Your HIV Diagnosis Now

RTB: The OMSJ has made it easy for you to turn in your false HIV diagnosis. Please read their article on “Erasing HIV’s Scarlet Letter,” and download the “Differential Diagnosis” forms, linked at OMSJ.org and below.

Erasing HIV’s “SCARLET LETTER” [Link]

1. Your first letter reminds your doctor who you are.  It should contain short questions about a) the tests he used, b) how the diagnosis was made, and c) the kind of response you seek.

If you are asked to come in for a visit, do so – and bring a recording device.  During your visit, turn it on and lay it in plain sight so that both sides will know that the conversation is being recorded.

In some states and countries, it is illegal to secretly record someone.  If the device is sitting in the open, it should not violate any laws.  If you’re not sure, turn it on and say clearly that you are recording your conversation “because what they will say is important and you don’t want to misunderstand anything they’ve said.”  If they refuse, leave the recorder on and re-state that they want the recording device off.  Then leave the clinic, go home and write another letter.

If the doctor happens to respond in writing and identifies the test used, you’ll probably find the test in this list.  If he doesn’t identify it, pick one test, and ask if he used that test.  Mail your certified letter.

Your follow-up letters should ask exactly how he conducted his diagnosis.  He should explain exactly how he ruled out each of the 100+ conditions that are known to “cross-react” to HIV tests – conditions that include flu, tetanus and hepatitis shots, pregnancy, colds, the flu, physical injuries, and so forth.  Your doctor should be able to list ALL OF THE KNOWN CROSS-REACTIONS and explain exactly how he ruled out each one.  If he fails to answer this simple test, it suggests that he did not conduct a competent diagnosis.

Just as a policeman must rule out gunshot wounds, stoke, diabetic shock or other ailments before arresting someone for drunk driving, your doctor must identify and all of the known conditions that cause false positive test results and explain exactly how he ruled them out.

Your objective is to pin down the doctor.  Don’t let him play “hide the penny” with you.

Once you’re satisfied that your first letter and follow-up questions have been answered, move to second letter.

2. Your second letter addresses questions about your CD4 count and flow cytometry.

This is important because the CDC has used a CD4 count of under 200 to identify AIDS cases.  Unless the doctor can describe exactly how the test was conducted, you must assume that the test used was improperly calibrated, was recalled, or was conducted by a lab tech who didn’t know what he was doing.  The fact that both Lab Corp and Quest Diagnostics paid multi-million dollar fines to settle felony complaints should be enough to ask many follow-up questions.

3. Your third letter can ask for a complete list of all of the pharmaceutical reps who visited his clinic in the past decade and how much money, free trips, speaking fees and other payment he received from the drug industry.

4. Use this letter if you are asked to return to the clinic for additional testing.

Because all HIV tests are inaccurate, unreliable and presumptive, taking one or a thousand tests is as unreliable as using one or a thousand broken clocks to verify the time.  Pin down the clinician on the tests that you’ve already taken before wasting your time with new tests.

5. Use this letter and this list to write each of your next letters.

For example, ask him how he ruled out Herpes simplex, and if he knew that the virus is known to cross-react with HIV tests.

Except for the first letter, the rest can be modified and sent in any order.  At some point, ask for copies of all of your medical records.  If a criminal complaint is ever filed against you, these letters and medical records will likely come in handy.  More likely than not, securing the records early will prevent someone from making changes when you start asking them embarrassing questions.

Use the comments section of this report for questions as a FAQ.