Category Archives: Your Stories

Return Your HIV Diagnosis Now

RTB: The OMSJ has made it easy for you to turn in your false HIV diagnosis. Please read their article on “Erasing HIV’s Scarlet Letter,” and download the “Differential Diagnosis” forms, linked at OMSJ.org and below.

Erasing HIV’s “SCARLET LETTER” [Link]

1. Your first letter reminds your doctor who you are.  It should contain short questions about a) the tests he used, b) how the diagnosis was made, and c) the kind of response you seek.

If you are asked to come in for a visit, do so – and bring a recording device.  During your visit, turn it on and lay it in plain sight so that both sides will know that the conversation is being recorded.

In some states and countries, it is illegal to secretly record someone.  If the device is sitting in the open, it should not violate any laws.  If you’re not sure, turn it on and say clearly that you are recording your conversation “because what they will say is important and you don’t want to misunderstand anything they’ve said.”  If they refuse, leave the recorder on and re-state that they want the recording device off.  Then leave the clinic, go home and write another letter.

If the doctor happens to respond in writing and identifies the test used, you’ll probably find the test in this list.  If he doesn’t identify it, pick one test, and ask if he used that test.  Mail your certified letter.

Your follow-up letters should ask exactly how he conducted his diagnosis.  He should explain exactly how he ruled out each of the 100+ conditions that are known to “cross-react” to HIV tests – conditions that include flu, tetanus and hepatitis shots, pregnancy, colds, the flu, physical injuries, and so forth.  Your doctor should be able to list ALL OF THE KNOWN CROSS-REACTIONS and explain exactly how he ruled out each one.  If he fails to answer this simple test, it suggests that he did not conduct a competent diagnosis.

Just as a policeman must rule out gunshot wounds, stoke, diabetic shock or other ailments before arresting someone for drunk driving, your doctor must identify and all of the known conditions that cause false positive test results and explain exactly how he ruled them out.

Your objective is to pin down the doctor.  Don’t let him play “hide the penny” with you.

Once you’re satisfied that your first letter and follow-up questions have been answered, move to second letter.

2. Your second letter addresses questions about your CD4 count and flow cytometry.

This is important because the CDC has used a CD4 count of under 200 to identify AIDS cases.  Unless the doctor can describe exactly how the test was conducted, you must assume that the test used was improperly calibrated, was recalled, or was conducted by a lab tech who didn’t know what he was doing.  The fact that both Lab Corp and Quest Diagnostics paid multi-million dollar fines to settle felony complaints should be enough to ask many follow-up questions.

3. Your third letter can ask for a complete list of all of the pharmaceutical reps who visited his clinic in the past decade and how much money, free trips, speaking fees and other payment he received from the drug industry.

4. Use this letter if you are asked to return to the clinic for additional testing.

Because all HIV tests are inaccurate, unreliable and presumptive, taking one or a thousand tests is as unreliable as using one or a thousand broken clocks to verify the time.  Pin down the clinician on the tests that you’ve already taken before wasting your time with new tests.

5. Use this letter and this list to write each of your next letters.

For example, ask him how he ruled out Herpes simplex, and if he knew that the virus is known to cross-react with HIV tests.

Except for the first letter, the rest can be modified and sent in any order.  At some point, ask for copies of all of your medical records.  If a criminal complaint is ever filed against you, these letters and medical records will likely come in handy.  More likely than not, securing the records early will prevent someone from making changes when you start asking them embarrassing questions.

Use the comments section of this report for questions as a FAQ.

 

A Shooting Gallery and an Hour Glass – Part Two

RTB is presents part two from a long-term observer and participant in the AIDS war, who has written an explorative, insightful essay in two parts for ReduceTheBurden.

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A Shooting Gallery and an Hour-Glass Part Two
One HIV Skeptics Continuing Journey

By William A.
for RTB

The Hour-Glass

Over the years, I began to notice the feeling that AIDS dissidents–particularly those with an ‘HIV’ diagnosis aimed at their head–seem almost shackled invisibly together… joined like some godforsaken chain-gang on a remote, dusty highway: When one of us stumbles, we all seem to lose our footing. When one of us falls we all feel vertigo. Someone else’s illness can beckon almost unconsciously, dancing off in the distance like a dark mirage…promising…shimmering…waiting. We seem to obsess about the health of other dissidents, revealing, in our often slightly mad speculation about what might be going on, this invisible connection to each others’ wellness. Or illness. An umbilical cord of wary hope. Or suppressed despair. As though someone else’s ability to survive the rain of death and hopelessness falling on us every day can make it more likely that we will defy the odds ourselves. Like anyone would, we find strength in numbers.

Nothing revealed this more powerfully to me than Christine Maggiore’s death. All these years she had soldiered on through a sea of hatred and vitriol, somehow not going completely mad from the intense scrutiny from the AIDS machine. Yet equally intense, if not more, was the almost unconscious scrutiny of many dissidents. We often live immersed in fear: this diagnosis is like being cast out into a sea of anxiety, a sea that can seem to extend beyond the horizon and it swallows people whole. Though many of us find ways to subdue the monstrous anxiety, I did notice how often others around me would ‘point’, somewhat nervously, to Christine as evidence that one could stay healthy, their trembling finger betraying the fear they felt that it was all somehow going to go pear-shaped anyway. There was a watchfulness about it. A kind of expectant waiting.

Unconsciously, many of us seemed to keep looking at her and then ‘looking at our watches’. I often wondered if she felt pressure to be the exception, or if she felt the many quiet, lonely hands clinging to her for reassurance and hope. I can’t see how it wouldn’t have been an enormous burden, however unintended it may have been by those who so understandably needed some signal, some sign of hope in a world awash with the expectation of early death that comes with this diagnosis.

I can’t help but be reminded of that, creepy scene in The Wizard of Oz, where the Wicked Witch of the West traps Dorothy in the tower-room and gingerly turns the Hour-Glass over and places it on the table, starting it flowing and saying evilly:

“Do you see that?  That’s how much longer you’ve got to be alive!  And it isn’t long, my pretty!  It isn’t long!” Continue reading A Shooting Gallery and an Hour Glass – Part Two

A Shooting Gallery and an Hour Glass – Part One

RTB is pleased to present a considered piece of writing from a long-term observer and participant in the AIDS war, who has written an explorative, insightful essay in two parts for ReduceTheBurden.

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Toronto, 1978

I had a horrible nightmare when I was about 13 years old. I found myself in a large, darkly lit space, a room eerily filled with anxiety and dread. It had no windows and no doors, but for one: on a landing at the top of a single flight of about a dozen steps. There was something behind that door. Something powerful, something terrible.

I wasn’t sure…I walked up the stairs, shaking with fear, feeling horribly exposed and vulnerable. I had to open the door. I had to see what was there. I made my way to the top, and stood there, trembling, and reached for the door-knob. I would open that door. I would face whatever was waiting there…

Yet somehow after a huge effort, I just couldn’t do it. The uncertainty of what lay beyond that looming door was just too terrifying.

And then I awoke. Continue reading A Shooting Gallery and an Hour Glass – Part One

Soon We Will All Be AIDS Patients

by Liam Scheff
Special for OMSJ.org

Nationalized Health Care – mandatory and without option of refusal – sits on our doorstep. It knocks, and for our sake, the President and lady speaker have saved us from answering the door. It will enter, with or without our consent. How will you benefit from socialized medicine?

The world has already experimented with socialized medicine in Canada, North Korea, Europe and Massachusetts, and the results are always the same: The quality of care is diminished and costs go up. But onward we go.

Soon every national medical emergency will be a personal emergency. Every government-produced mass vaccination plan will be pushed on you by your family’s government-approved physician. You’ll be getting the most up-to-date paranoia, right there in your doctor’s office, and you will be legally mandated to comply with her or his advice. Because it’s a matter of law. Because it’s science. And government science is never wrong.

In fact, you may discover that you now have a variety of diseases that you’d never been aware of. For example, Americans who have not yet taken the time to understand the criminal syndicate called the AIDS industry, are about to meet it face to face.

At present, it is only gay men and poor women who give birth in public hospitals who must turn over the intimate details of their sex lives and personal relationships to the state. But no longer. You are now an AIDS patient.

Read the exclusive at OMSJ.

Quitting Drugs Is Not Enough

Some folks who have read my story about quitting AIDS drugs and nearly two dozen other prescription drugs seem to think I attribute my improved health to that choice alone.

It isn’t that simple.

There is no doubt in my mind that taking so many prescription drugs, even under the care of physicians, was damaging me and my health. Quitting them was one essential step–among several–that I had to take just to recover my wits enough to move forward.

Good health, or improving one’s poor health, also requires attention to what we put into our system and how we maintain it. In my case, it also led me to rethink just about everything I thought I knew about medical care and health.

I’m only going to summarize here some highlights of the path I’ve followed to address my seriously declining health. The details and sequence of actions are vague, because each individual’s plan must be customized to fit their needs. Do as much research as possible for yourself (thank goodness for the Internet).

Good alternative or wholistic practitioners can be difficult to find, but may prove invaluable, especially early on. Seek out healers, not just doctors. When dealing with serious illnesses such as cancer, autoimmune disorders (including auto deficiencies), MS, “AIDS”, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and others, it is important to make significant changes immediately to halt the decline of health. Once recovery is underway there will be time to review and evaluate each of these areas of change to determine which ones should be made permanent.

What follows is based on my personal experience. While it is not intended as medical advice, I do hope some readers might find some valuable suggestions to improve their health. Continue reading Quitting Drugs Is Not Enough

Artists Welcome at RTB

Are you an artist? Submit your RTB-themed web art, for web posters, or for printing as stickers and flyers.

Make a statement that supports the idea of improving the lives of Aids patients by “reducing the burden” and “removing the stigma” of the diagnosis; talk about the HIV testing problem, or the overly-harsh and terribly limited choice of Aids drugs. Express yourself.

How to submit artwork and photography:

Upload your JPEG, GIF or PNG image to Flickr or Photobucket, or the host of your choice, and send us the link, along with your name and a description of your work. RTB will feature your work on the site, post a link to your site, if you have one, and make your art available to others to use and enjoy.

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What are the Side-Effects You’ve Experienced with Aids Drugs?

What’s your story? RTB wants to know.

Have you taken Aids drugs? What were the side-effects you experienced, or are experiencing?

  • Do you think the drugs hurt, or helped?
  • What was successful? What did you categorize as success?
  • What caused pain? How did you deal with it?
  • What can you recommend to others?

Please share in as much detail as you’re comfortable with…

Write For Us

Do you have a story to tell about HIV testing? About Aids drugs? About the Aids industry or doctors? A personal success story? Consider submitting your story for publication at RTB.

  • Have you recently been given an Hiv test result? Do you currently have a “positive” diagnosis?
  • What has your experience been? With the drugs, with the doctors?
  • Have you been on Aids drugs? Did they help, or hurt? Or both?
  • Have you discovered methods of improving or regaining health using food, micronutrients, excercise, or other non-toxic medicines? Do you use specific supplements to improve your health while on standard drugs?
  • Are you stigmatized because of your test result? Would you like to challenge your test result legally?

Send us your story, and we’ll feature it in our ‘featured articles’ section.

  • When you were tested, did your doctor or clinician tell you that the tests give no single, standardized result?
  • Did he or she tell you that you were permanently infected?
  • Did he or she give you access to the standard medical literature on Hiv testing, or the Aids diagnosis?

Tell us your story, and RTB will write to your doctor or clinician and ask them why they haven’t given you all the literature on HIV testing, and we’ll publish their response.

Submit your story in the pane below, or to submissions@reducetheburden.org. Please include your full name, an email where you can be reached, and how you would like to be identified in your article (ie. only first, or first and last name).