Category Archives: Children

Ask DeBlasio Why: New York City Foster Children Used as Guinea Pigs

By Elizabeth Ely, guest contributor.

Imagine a city government without accountability. It can snatch children presumed to be HIV positive for supposed medical neglect, and not even evidence that they are well can stop it. Despite evidence that these children do better off drugs than on them — it’s the very reason they have been removed — the city enrolls them in experimental drug trials.

In other words, your city government is not accountable to its people, and its science is not even accountable to physical reality or the safety of its young test subjects.
Continue reading Ask DeBlasio Why: New York City Foster Children Used as Guinea Pigs

The 11th Commandment – AIDS, Sex and Society

RTB: Liam Scheff Interview on Fintan Dunne’s AIDS is Over.com

by Liam Scheff

In August of 2008, I gave an interview to Fintan Dunne of Breakfornews.com and AIDSisover.com. We discussed the religious/cult dynamic of the AIDS industry and the catch-22 in which those who uncritically accept the paradigm find themselves. We went over the events of the Incarnation Children’s Center, briefly, before turning to recent admission by the World Health Organization that AIDS is, once again, predicted to be specifically confined to the African and Gay populations. The following is an edited transcript of that conversation.

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Continue reading The 11th Commandment – AIDS, Sex and Society

Poor Families Pressed Into Vaccine Trials by Drug Companies; 12 Babies Die

“Because they can’t experiment in Europe or the United States, they come to do it in third-world countries”

RTB: The dirty secret of international pharmaceutical business is that testing dangerous drugs is easier where human rights laws don’t apply – ie, in poor populations worldwide, and especially, outside of the US and Europe.

by David Gutierrez, staff writer
December 9 2008

NaturalNews) Major pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline has been accused of pressuring poor Third World parents into enrolling their children in experimental drug trials that have led to the deaths of at least 12 infants.

The company is currently testing an experimental pneumonia vaccine on children under the age of one in Argentina, Colombia and Panama. According to the Argentine Federation of Health Professionals (Feprosa), poor Argentinean parents have been “pressured and forced into signing consent forms.”
Continue reading Poor Families Pressed Into Vaccine Trials by Drug Companies; 12 Babies Die

Clinical Trials in NYC Orphans

by Liam Scheff

The following is evidence in the long-running investigation into the use of toxic drugs on orphans in New York City in the Incarnation Children’s Center orphanage and in New York’s major hospitals, and then in Aids medicine in general.

Background on this story – here and here.

Below is the ICC webpage as it appeared when I first looked at it, in 2003. It was taken down in early 2004, after press attention focused on the practice of using orphans in government and pharma-sponsored drug trials.

The page announces the clinical trials then in progress, as well as making some strong statements about improvement of patient health without the admittedly toxic and potentially fatal standard Aids drugs. Continue reading Clinical Trials in NYC Orphans

Polio – Harper’s Magazine 1955

Who is responsible, and why, for the chaotic confusion over the polio inoculations? A noted medical journalist disentangles the essential facts.

THE PEAK of the polio season usually comes in the second half of August or the first part of September. This year, we might have had substantially fewer cases of polio than usual. As it is, the number we do have will be largely a matter of luck.

We will have whatever number of cases do occur instead of the smaller number we might have had because of the Great Vaccine Mess. During this past spring, the country was made to witness a spectacle without precedent. On April 12, Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr., of the University of Michigan, reported on the largest and most carefully executed field trial of a vaccine product in history, the 1954 test of the Salk polio vaccine. The trial confirmed a major medical discovery.

The Salk vaccine was found to be adequately effective in preventing paralytic poliomyelitis, and remarkably safe. A month later, the hopes the Francis report had aroused, and the vaccine itself, had been very nearly dissolved in an incredible sea of confusion.
Continue reading Polio – Harper’s Magazine 1955

How a Continuing Polio Epidemic is being Hidden

Excerpt from a chapter of “Fear of the Invisible”
by Janine Roberts

I have been told again and again by health authorities that the polio vaccine is a marvellous lifesaver – and I had accepted this on trust. As no one I knew doubted this, I had no reason to question it. I knew however that it is easy to invent history. If a false history is repeated often enough, the chances are that people will believe it. It is simply a matter of most of us not having time to check all the facts for ourselves.

But now I knew of the possibility that pesticides might cause polio, I had a very clear question to answer.  There were no great American polio epidemics after 1956. What stopped them: the withdrawal of the pesticides – or the introduction of the vaccine?

Most modern histories of the polio vaccine say its launch went smoothly – although many mention a brief hiccup early on called the ‘Cutter Incident,’ describing this as a simple error that was quickly rectified. But what I learnt from reading contemporary newspapers and medical reports was very different.
Continue reading How a Continuing Polio Epidemic is being Hidden

Fatal Drug Error Kept From Family – Nevirapine

Associated Press
Dec. 16, 2004 | by Chris Hawke

Never Told That Experimental AIDS Drugs Likely Killed Woman

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A family photograph of Joyce Hafford, who died in 2003 in an experimental drug regimen. (AP /APTN)

(AP) A pregnant Tennessee woman who enrolled in federally funded research in hopes of saving her soon-to-be-born son from getting AIDS died last year when doctors continued to give her an experimental drug regimen despite signs of liver failure, government memos say.

Family members of Joyce Ann Hafford say the 33-year-old HIV-positive woman died without ever holding her newborn boy. They also said they never were told the National Institutes of Health concluded the drug therapy likely caused her death. Continue reading Fatal Drug Error Kept From Family – Nevirapine

The ICC Investigation – Deaths in Studies with NYC Orphans – AHRP on the VERA Institute Report

ALLIANCE FOR HUMAN RESEARCH PROTECTION
Promoting Openness, Full Disclosure, and Accountability
http://www.ahrp.org and http://ahrp.blogspot.com

The final report of the VERA Institute investigation commissioned in 2005 by the NYC Administration of Child Services will hardly put to rest the controversy surrounding a 20-year period during which children in foster care were subjected to toxic Phase I and Phase II AIDS drug and vaccine experiments–mostly without parental consent and without the protection of an independent advocate–as mandated by federal regulations in force then and now.
Continue reading The ICC Investigation – Deaths in Studies with NYC Orphans – AHRP on the VERA Institute Report

On World Water Day, A Call for Improved Sanitation

Source: http://www.voanews.com/english/archive/2008-03/2008-03-20-voa32.cfm

report on World Water Day – Download (MP3) audio clip
report on World Water Day – Listen (MP3) audio clip

Sanitation is the theme of this year’s World Water Day (March 20). UN development agencies are calling for greater public awareness and donor support for improving sanitation in the developing world – where, for example, more than two billion people lack access to toilets. From Washington, VOA’s William Eagle reports on the some of the sanitation needs cited in sub-Saharan Africa.

Water-Day-logo-08-WEB

Safe water and sanitation are rare in much of Africa. UN sources say less than 40 percent of all Africans have access to acceptable facilities for the disposal of human waste. Instead, in some of Africa’s overcrowded cities, plastic bags of waste, called “flying toilets,” are thrown into ditches and open sewers. In rural areas, less than a third of the people have access to toilets or latrines that efficiently separate waste from drinking water. As a result, many people defecate in open fields.

The result can be deadly: UNICEF says diarrheal diseases, mostly caused by poor sanitation and hygiene, kill nearly two million people around the world every year, including 5,000 children a day. Many of those affected are African. Continue reading On World Water Day, A Call for Improved Sanitation

Nearly 40 percent of world’s population lacks access to a proper toilet

Source: http://www.apha.org/publications/tnh/archives/2008/May+2008/WebExclusives/ToiletWebEx.htm

The Nation’s Health
May 2008

Sixty-two per cent of Africans do not have access to an improved sanitation facility — a proper toilet — which separates human waste from human contact, according to the World Health Organization/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. A global report will be published later this year, however, preliminary data on the situation in Africa was released March 20 as part of World Water Day 2008. The event, built around the theme “Sanitation Matters,” seeks to draw attention to the plight of some 2.6 billion people around the world who live without access to a toilet at home and thus are vulnerable to a range of health risks.

“Sanitation is a cornerstone of public health,” said WHO Director-general Margaret Chan, MD, MPH. “Improved sanitation contributes enormously to human health and well-being, especially for girls and women. We know that simple, achievable interventions can reduce the risk of contracting diarrheal disease by a third.”
Continue reading Nearly 40 percent of world’s population lacks access to a proper toilet

Water diaries tell of life in Cambodia

Source: http://www.alertnet.org/db/blogs/24453/2008/02/20-102524-1.htm

20 Mar 2008 10:25:00 GMT
Written by: Becky Webb

khfloatinghouse193
– A man transports his floating house up river near Chong Khneas floating village in Cambodia. REUTERS/Tim Chong

Even now, during the dry season, water seems to penetrate all aspects of Cambodian culture. Thousands of Cambodians earn their living by rice farming, while many more live on floating villages – whole communities set adrift along the river.

Life for people here is ruled by water – too little rain and the rice production will fail, too much rain and the fishing industry will suffer as the rivers and lakes swell, making catching fish all the more difficult.
Continue reading Water diaries tell of life in Cambodia

World Water Day – UNICEF

Source: http://www.unicef.org/media/media_43306.html

6 in 10 Africans remain without access to proper toilet: poor sanitation threatens public health

GENEVA, 20 March 2008 – Sixty-two percent of Africans do not have access to an improved sanitation facility — a proper toilet — which separates human waste from human contact, according to the WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. A global report will be released later this year, however, preliminary data on the situation in Africa was released today as part of World Water Day 2008. The Day, built around the theme that “Sanitation Matters,” seeks to draw attention to the plight of some 2.6 billion people around the world who live without access to even a toilet at home and thus are vulnerable to a range of health risks.
Continue reading World Water Day – UNICEF

Water and Sanitation

Source: http://www.sulabhenvis.in/pages/database_detail.asp?id=32

Every eight seconds a child dies of a water-related disease. Every year more than five million human beings die from illnesses linked to unsafe drinking water, unclean domestic environments and improper excreta disposal.

At any given time perhaps one-half of all peoples in the developing world are suffering from one or more of the six main diseases associated with water supply and sanitation (diarrhoea, ascaris, dracunculiasis, hookworm, schistosomiasis and trachoma). In addition, the health burden includes the annual expenditure of over ten million person-years of time and effort by women and female children carrying water from distant, often polluted sources.

Nearly a quarter of humanity still remains today without proper access to water and sanitation.

During the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1981-1990), some 1600 million people were served with safe water and about 750 million with adequate excreta disposal facilities. However, because of population growth of 800 million people in developing countries, by 1990 there remained a total of 1015 million people without safe water and 1764 million without adequate sanitation.

Overall progress in reaching the unserved has been poor since 1990. Approximately one billion people around the world still lack safe water and more than two billion do not have adequate excreta disposal facilities. Rapid population growth and lagging rates of coverage expansion has left more people without access to basic sanitation today than in 1990.

Another problem with coverage goals is the magnitude of resources needed to achieve them. At the Global Consultation of Safe Water and Sanitation for the 1990s, held in New Delhi in 1990, it was stated that universal coverage by the year 2000 would require US$ 50 billion per year, a five-fold increase in current investment levels.

In 1992, WHO concluded its monitoring of the Decade with the estimate that a total of US$ 133.9 billion had been invested in water supply and sanitation during the period 1981-1990, of which 55% was spent on water and 45% on sanitation. Urban areas received 74% of the total and rural areas only 26%. Contrary to widespread perceptions, almost two-thirds of all funds were provided by national sources and only a third by external organizations.

WHO estimates that it costs an average of US$ 105 per person to provide water supplies in urban areas and US$ 50 in rural areas, while sanitation costs an average of US$ 145 in urban areas and US$ 30 in rural areas.

Water supply and sanitation can be viewed as a process having three interactive elements. The most fundamental of these elements is the availability of safe drinking water and sanitary means of excreta disposal. This means 20 to 40 litres of water per person per day located within a reasonable distance from the household. Safe water implies protection of water sources as well as proper transport and storage within the home. It also means facilities for bathing and for washing clothes and kitchen utensils which are clean and well-drained. Sanitary excreta disposal is the isolation and control of faeces from both adults and children so that they do not come into contact with water sources, food or people. To break the transmission chain of faecally-related diseases, good standards of personal and domestic hygiene, which begin with handwashing after defecation, are essential.

A second element in the water and sanitation development process is the use and care of water and sanitation facilities. People must use these facilities properly to obtain the health benefits inherent in them. This means knowing how to protect and store water safely, how to maintain personal and domestic cleanliness, how to care for excreta disposal facilities and how to avoid or minimize unsanitary environmental conditions. Knowledge transfer, behaviour change and personal responsibility are the key factors.

The third of the interactive elements is the institutional support from the communities, developing agencies and government policies that provide a framework for water and sanitation improvements. Experience has shown that community-based efforts, whether in a small village or a large metropolis, are most effective in identifying and meeting peoples’ needs. Governments, especially at the regional and national levels, are more effective as facilitators of the development process than providers of water and sanitation improvements.

Water contaminated by human, chemical or industrial wastes can cause a variety of communicable diseases through ingestion or physical contact:

Water-borne diseases: caused by the ingestion of water contaminated by human or animal faeces or urine containing pathogenic bacteria or viruses; include cholera, typhoid, amoebic and bacillary dysentery and other diarrhoeal diseases.

Water-washed diseases: caused by poor personal hygiene and skin or eye contact with contaminated water; include scabies, trachoma and flea, lice and tick-borne diseases.

Water-based diseases: caused by parasites found in intermediate organisms living in water; include dracunculiasis, schistosomiasis and other helminths.

Water-related diseases: caused by insect vectors which breed in water; include dengue, filariasis, malaria, onchocerciasis, trypanosomiasis and yellow fever.

No single type of intervention has greater overall impact upon the national development and public health than does the provision of safe drinking water and the proper disposal of human excreta. The direct effects of improved water and sanitation services upon health are most clearly seen in the case of water-related diseases, which arise from the ingestion of pathogens in contaminated water or food and from insects or other vectors associated with water. Improved water and sanitation can reduce morbidity and mortality rates of some of the most serious of these diseases by 20% to 80%.

ESTIMATES OF MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY OF WATER-RELATED DISEASES

Disease

Morbidity

Mortality

(deaths/year)

Relationship of Disease to Water Supply and Sanitation

Diarrhoeal diseases

1,000,000,000

3,300,000

Strongly related to unsanitary excreta disposal, poor personal and domestic hygiene, unsafe drinking water

Infection with intestinal helminths

1,500,000,000

100,000

Strongly related to unsanitary excreta disposal, poor personal and domestic hygiene

Schistosomiasis

200,000,000

200,000

Strongly related to unsanitary excreta disposal and absence of nearby sources of safe water

Dracunculiasis

100,000

Strongly related to unsafe drinking water

Trachoma

150,000,000

Strongly related to lack of face washing, often due to absence of nearby sources of safe water

Malaria

400,000,000

1,500,000

Related to poor water management, water storage, operation of water points and drainage

Dengue Fever

1,750,000

20,000

Related to poor solid wastes management, water storage, operation of water points and drainage

Poliomyelitis

114,000

Related to unsanitary excreta disposal, poor personal and domestic hygiene, unsafe drinking water

Trypanosomiasis

275,000

130,000

Related to the absence of nearby sources of safe water

Bancroftian filariasis

72,800,000

Related to poor water management, water storage, operation of water points and drainage

Onchocerciasis

17,700,000

40,000

Related to poor water management in large-scale projects