AIDS Eugenics in Uganda

PLUSNews Uganda: Julius Ochen, a resident of Amuria, told IRIN/PlusNews that he had stopped taking his HIV medication.When you take these drugs without eating, they make you weak and reduce your strength – you feel like vomiting,” he said.

“It’s true that TB drugs and ARVs are very strong; if taken without food, they make someone doze and feel weak, but we encourage our clients to take them,” said Beatrice Okware, branch manager for the AIDS Support Organization in Soroti district.

Poor nutrition weakens the body’s defences against the virus, hastens progress from HIV to AIDS, and makes it difficult to take ARVs, which can sometimes increase a patient’s appetite. Sufficient food can help reduce some side-effects of ARVs and promote adherence to drug regimens.

by Liam Scheff

Would you take a drug that made you vomit and have diarrhea if you were already starving to death?

If you are a believer in the AIDS religion, the answer is…

Well… You wouldn’t take the drug, but you’d make sure that the starving people in Uganda did.

No, no hyperbole, just old fashioned insanity, and a touch of eugenics.

The international AIDS coalition tells us: Starving Ugandans must have these drugs, FDA Black-Box labeled, meaning, yes, they’ve maimed and killed at normal, prescribed doses. But what they most often do is cause weight loss, diarrhea, nausea, horrible rash, fat wasting, muscle wasting, and…did I mention they had a few side-effects?
But, here comes the HIV/AIDS crew to make it all sane for us. “Never mind the food, Stuff down your ARVs!”

Read the story. Cry me a river. Somebody write their Congressman, and tell them to stick it. This is your money at work, after all. $50 billion US dollars for “AIDS care” in Africa, a good-will gift from George Bush the Second to abate the scorn of the needful Democrats, who clapped like trained seals when he pledged the money.

Now how about some food, clean water, and a removal of HIV testing from Africa?

But what am I saying? ARVs save lives. Science says so, and science is never wrong. Especially medical science. Yes, they kill, and have horrible side-effects, but it’s worth it to stop the spread of HIV.

Say it like you believe it, or the AIDS mainstream may peg you for “AIDS dementia.” A diagnosis they give, like the Kremlin psychiatrists did in the old USSR, to those who ask troubling questions. “You don’t agree with us, therefore you must be insane.” And remember, they’re scientists, so they’re allowed to say this sort of thing. And it’s true, by virtue of their sciencism. Nothing can change that. And there is no debate.

But what are we to do with this information? We read it in the medical literature. The medical literature is science, therefore it must also be true:

HIV tests don’t work. They’re not specific, standardized, and they have no particular or distinctive clinical or diagnostic meaning. This, according to the mainstream literature on HIV testing, is so. And I’ll take them at their word. I don’t know why they would admit such a thing otherwise.

What does it mean? It means that the people we’re tagging as “HIV positive” are no more “HIV positive” than you or me, or anyone you know who isn’t a poor, starving rural African.

There was a movement birthed the 18th Century, that budded in the 19th and absolutely blossomed in the 20th. That was an idea of a Malthusian world, in which a struggle was constantly afoot for sustenance, and that the reckless breeders of the world would endanger the civilized world though their libidinousness. Those breeders were, in the Eugencists view, the poor, the ‘native,’ the African, American-Indian, South-American. Even the Irish. Even the Jew.

That strain of thinking isn’t dead. It’s just more subtle.
You’ll find it below:


UGANDA: Hungry HIV-positive patients abandon ARVs


A prolonged dry spell has withered the region’s traditional crops

AMURIA, 18 August 2009 (PlusNews) HIV-positive patients in drought-hit eastern Uganda are abandoning their anti-retroviral regimens in droves, and leaders fear that unless more food becomes available, they will soon be dealing with drug resistance and death.

“In our assessment in Teso [a sub-region in eastern Uganda], we found that HIV/AIDS patients in the region take their ARV drugs on the understanding of food [being available]; in the absence of food, many stop taking their ARVs and this risks their lives,” Musa Ecweru, State Minister for Relief, Disaster Preparedness and Refugees, told IRIN/PlusNews.

A prolonged dry spell has withered the region’s traditional crops, leaving hundreds of thousands of people hungry; instead of eating a balanced diet from their farms, they are surviving on a diet of bought maize meal.

“I have never seen a famine like this – people can’t afford a meal for several days,” said Omax Hebron Omeda, Resident Commissioner of eastern Uganda’s Amuria District. “The most affected people are those on ARVs. Very soon, if government doesn’t intervene by scaling up the food supply, people are going to die.”

Julius Ochen, a resident of Amuria, told IRIN/PlusNews that he had stopped taking his HIV medication. “When you take these drugs without eating, they make you weak and reduce your strength – you feel like vomiting,” he said.

“If the government doesn’t address the food crisis, many of us who are on ARVs are going to die,” said Rose Anyiat, another resident.

Keeping patients on drugs

“It’s true that TB drugs and ARVs are very strong; if taken without food, they make someone doze and feel weak, but we encourage our clients to take them,” said Beatrice Okware, branch manager for the AIDS Support Organization in Soroti district.

“We are carrying out sensitization and encouraging our clients on ARVs to continue taking the drugs because if they default, there are side effects,” she added.

Poor nutrition weakens the body’s defences against the virus, hastens progress from HIV to AIDS, and makes it difficult to take ARVs, which can sometimes increase a patient’s appetite. Sufficient food can help reduce some side-effects of ARVs and promote adherence to drug regimens.

Zainabu Akol, director of HIV/AIDS programmes in the Ministry of Health, said health workers in government medical centres were warning patients of the dangers of interrupting their ARV regimens.

“We frankly told them that it’s a choice of life or death,” she said, adding that some patients had heeded the advice and gone back on their drugs.

The government has spent an estimated US$10 million on food for the Teso sub-region, with some specially designated for people living with HIV, but local leaders say much more is needed; local media have reported that more than 40 people in the region have died of hunger since May.

Food gap

“The food being given to our people is just a drop in the ocean,” said Patrick Amuriat, chairman of Teso Parliamentary Group. “What can one cup of beans and two of posho [maize flour] do? It’s just for one meal.”

“We are now giving special attention to people on ARVs; we are discussing with the Ministry of Health to package a special arrangement to help these vulnerable people,” said Minister Ecweru. “They need to be supported with supplementary food to balance their diet.”

A total of 17 districts in northwestern, northeastern and eastern Uganda have been listed as worst-hit by a nationwide drought; another 31 districts are experiencing “acute food shortages” and four districts have been evaluated as “moderately affected”.

Note the “Related Stories”:

More on food security and HIV
Food shortages threaten ARV adherence
“We need food”
HIV-positive mums struggle to find safe food for their babies

Thanks to Ricci Davis for sending me this story. See Ricci’s Uganda interview Here and Here.

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